Fuji Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR Lens Review

The new “pro” zoom from Fuji is finally starting to hit the streets. My favorite local camera store, Competitive Cameras, actually got two in last weekend. The first guy on the list drove halfway across the state of Texas to get his. I was number two.

I became a fan of Fuji when they released the XT-1 last year. It had the feel of the manual cameras I was used to from the days of film, but with a size and feature set of a modern digital camera. I also really loved the size and build quality of their prime lenses. The 23mm and 56mm are incredible lenses. Combined with the XT-1, they make for a potent street shooting and travel combination.

Which brings us to their new big brother, the Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 zoom lens. This definitely marks Fuji’s attempt at producing a pro-grade lens and the size reflects it. While I’m not selling any of my primes any time soon, I also know there is a time and place for a solid, fast short zoom.

The first reaction to mounting it on my XT-1 was “damn, this is a big lens”. This is actually pretty similar in size to the Nikon 24-120mm lens which I found to be a boat anchor after carrying it around all day on a Nikon D600.

I carry my XT-1 cross-body on a DSPTCH Standard Sling. The 16-55mm definitely sticks out further than the primes, but I didn’t find to too unbalancing, so I decided to take the chance and bring the lens home.

Here’s the 16-55mm compared to the 23mm and 56mm. Yep, it is that big, with a wide 77mm filter size to boot.

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And here it is hanging off the front of the XT-1. The vertical grip would probably improve the balance, but I don’t find it too bad on the XT-1. I definitely don’t see this as a lens to use on any of the other smaller Fuji bodies.

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The first weekend, I shot a kids birthday party to get used to the lens. It was crappy weather, so lots of high-ISO indoor shooting or flash shots with a Nissin i40. We finally had some nice weather this weekend, so I trucked the 16-55mm and family off to one of our favorite local parks for some shooting.

I’m usually a RAW shooter, but to stay consistent, all the images for the review are jpegs straight from the camera, shot in Standard profile with +1 color. Clicking an image will bring up the full sized files for pixel peepers.

First up is the obligatory wall shot to see how the lens handles in the corners. Since you’re buying this lens to shoot at f/2.8, I’ll only post those versions. I also took a set at f/8 that are extremely sharp across the frame. All shots are at ISO 200.

16mm at f/2.8
16mm at f/2.8
23mm at f/2.8
23mm at f/2.8
35mm at f/2.8
35mm at f/2.8
55mm at f/2.8
55mm at f/2.8

Center sharpness at all the focal lengths is incredible. Wide open at 16mm we get a bit of curvature and the corners are a bit soft. At 23mm and 35mm, I see just a touch of softness at the outer edges, and 85mm is essentially perfect from edge to edge. I don’t see any vignetting at any of the focal lengths, but I’ll have to try against a white background.

Overall, this is an insanely sharp, high performance lens that holds its own against the f/2.8 offerings from the big dogs. Here are a few more shots from out at the park. The small versions are a bit distorted, so click to see a visually correct version.

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After carrying this lens around for afternoon, I would call this lens a keeper. Like any f/2.8 zoom, you’re really buying it to use at that aperture, and it doesn’t disappoint.

The focus on this lens is extremely fast and quiet. The aperture ring has very solid detentes, more so than any of my primes, so no accidentally knocking the aperture loose. The zoom ring is just stiff enough. It is easy to turn, but the lens won’t start to creep out while hanging around your next. This was a major complaint of mine with the Nikon 24-120mm. I also like the bokeh I got from this lens.

For the bad side, this lens pretty much kills the typical stealth mode of the XT-1 with a prime. This bad boy sticks out from your body. And I’m not a fan of the lens hood. Due to how I carry the camera, I was catching my hand on the irregular edge while walking before I finally found a comfortable angle to carry it at.

So should you buy it? You really can’t go wrong with this lens assuming you can stomach the size and price. If you’re comfortable with the primes and going lean and mean, this isn’t your lens. I like the versatility this fast, sharp lens brings to the game and it will definitely be a travel companion going forwards. In fact, this lens along with its big brother, the Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 lens, are probably all some people will need.

(Note: this review was originally posted on another site I was experimenting with. I didn’t like the experiment, so I moved the review over here)

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